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The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi

by Eugene Ostashevsky

eBook
An original collection from one of the most active poets in contemporary literature.

The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi
is a poem-novel about the relationship between a pirate and a parrot who, after capturing a certain quantity of prizes, are shipwrecked on a deserted island, where they proceed to discuss whether they would have been able to communicate with people indigenous to the island, had there been any. Characterized by multilingual punning, humor puerile and set-theoretical, philosophical irony and narrative handicaps, Eugene Ostashevsky's new large-scale project draws on sources as various as early modern texts about pirates and animal intelligence, old-school hip-hop, and game theory to pursue the themes of emigration, incomprehension, untranslatability, and the otherness of others.

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Publisher: New York Review Books

Kindle Book

  • Release date: March 14, 2017

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781681370910
  • File size: 4157 KB
  • Release date: March 14, 2017

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781681370910
  • File size: 4157 KB
  • Release date: March 14, 2017

Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

subjects

Fiction Poetry

Languages

English

An original collection from one of the most active poets in contemporary literature.

The Pirate Who Does Not Know the Value of Pi
is a poem-novel about the relationship between a pirate and a parrot who, after capturing a certain quantity of prizes, are shipwrecked on a deserted island, where they proceed to discuss whether they would have been able to communicate with people indigenous to the island, had there been any. Characterized by multilingual punning, humor puerile and set-theoretical, philosophical irony and narrative handicaps, Eugene Ostashevsky's new large-scale project draws on sources as various as early modern texts about pirates and animal intelligence, old-school hip-hop, and game theory to pursue the themes of emigration, incomprehension, untranslatability, and the otherness of others.

Expand title description text